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Collision conference day 2 - Conference momentum continues as top tech innovators take centre stage

Posted by
Natalie Sauvé
Insights

Collision conference day 2 - Conference momentum continues as top tech innovators take centre stage

Écrit par
Natalie Sauvé

For a conference that opened with Victoria Day fireworks and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, it’s amazing how Collision seems to be picking up steam as it moves along.  

Here’s our day two recap.

The future is bright for Virtual Reality

Dominic Mallinson, SVP of R&D at PlayStation, believes VR will be commonplace in homes and businesses. He says PlayStation is focused on high-end VR and improving the user experience, and offered a few forward-looking takeaways.

First, he sees “gaze tracking” as the future of VR, saying that users will soon be able to make eye contact in the game. Second, Mallinson believes rapid improvements will drive user adoption - headsets will become lighter, wireless and more comfortable while content will continue to be added (400 PSVR titles and counting.)

Moving to the Cloud

Digital transformation is still a hot topic in almost every industry as businesses try to stay ahead of consumer needs in the age of technology. Credit Karma co-founder and CTO Ryan Graciano spoke about his company’s three-year journey to the cloud, providing the audience with useful tips and key learnings.  

When undergoing a transformation of this scale, Graciano stressed that your technology objectives must be business objectives. He said that security is part of Credit Karma’s culture, and they make everything “secure by design” to ensure customer information stays private.  

Putting the heart into the machine  

Element AI – an artificial intelligence company that’s turning cutting-edge AI research into scalable solutions for businesses – also took the stage. CEO Jean-François Gagné sat down with Jeremy Kaplan, Editor-in-Chief at Digital Trends, to talk about the biggest challenges his company is facing in the AI industry.    

Gagné spoke about the need to build an ethical AI framework that takes different human perspectives into account in order to remove the bias that has generated negative headlines in the AI industry over the past year. He also discussed the vital importance of AI companies properly managing data, whether or not there’s a need for more government regulation, and how being transparent with users can help build consumer trust.

Canada’s new digital charter

Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains also gave a keynote speech and participated in a panel discussion where he outlined why his government introduced a 10-point digital charter designed to build trust and help Canada compete in the data-driven digital economy.

“Innovation cannot happen at the expense of privacy,” said Bains, who called on businesses to work with government to build consumer trust in our digital institutions.

With the Collision Conference winding down, check back tomorrow for a full recap of day three.

For a conference that opened with Victoria Day fireworks and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, it’s amazing how Collision seems to be picking up steam as it moves along.  

Here’s our day two recap.

The future is bright for Virtual Reality

Dominic Mallinson, SVP of R&D at PlayStation, believes VR will be commonplace in homes and businesses. He says PlayStation is focused on high-end VR and improving the user experience, and offered a few forward-looking takeaways.

First, he sees “gaze tracking” as the future of VR, saying that users will soon be able to make eye contact in the game. Second, Mallinson believes rapid improvements will drive user adoption - headsets will become lighter, wireless and more comfortable while content will continue to be added (400 PSVR titles and counting.)

Moving to the Cloud

Digital transformation is still a hot topic in almost every industry as businesses try to stay ahead of consumer needs in the age of technology. Credit Karma co-founder and CTO Ryan Graciano spoke about his company’s three-year journey to the cloud, providing the audience with useful tips and key learnings.  

When undergoing a transformation of this scale, Graciano stressed that your technology objectives must be business objectives. He said that security is part of Credit Karma’s culture, and they make everything “secure by design” to ensure customer information stays private.  

Putting the heart into the machine  

Element AI – an artificial intelligence company that’s turning cutting-edge AI research into scalable solutions for businesses – also took the stage. CEO Jean-François Gagné sat down with Jeremy Kaplan, Editor-in-Chief at Digital Trends, to talk about the biggest challenges his company is facing in the AI industry.    

Gagné spoke about the need to build an ethical AI framework that takes different human perspectives into account in order to remove the bias that has generated negative headlines in the AI industry over the past year. He also discussed the vital importance of AI companies properly managing data, whether or not there’s a need for more government regulation, and how being transparent with users can help build consumer trust.

Canada’s new digital charter

Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains also gave a keynote speech and participated in a panel discussion where he outlined why his government introduced a 10-point digital charter designed to build trust and help Canada compete in the data-driven digital economy.

“Innovation cannot happen at the expense of privacy,” said Bains, who called on businesses to work with government to build consumer trust in our digital institutions.

With the Collision Conference winding down, check back tomorrow for a full recap of day three.

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