Insights

“Techlash” is over-indexing in Canada: 3 takeaways from our new global report

Posted by
Natalie Sauvé
Insights

“Techlash” is over-indexing in Canada: 3 takeaways from our new global report

Écrit par
Natalie Sauvé

“Don’t wait for someone to tell you to do the right thing. You know what’s right.”

As a mother to young boys, I’ve had the chance to share the above wisdom more times than I’d care to admit. It would seem today’s consumers have the same advice for the technology sector.

According to our new global research report, Techlash 2020: Why the technology sector needs to lean in now on consumer expectations, consumers want the tech sector to take a long hard look at its policies and practices. They want these companies to do what’s right by them and a majority want governments to step in and help make sure it happens.

From a Canadian perspective, here are just a few of the takeaways I found most interesting:

Canadians believe that the technology sector isn't doing enough

61 per cent of Canadians agree that “technology companies need to take more action to address the consequences of their policies, practices and products in order to (re)build trust as good corporate citizens who do what’s right for consumers.”

Not surprisingly, we’ve seen an increase in conversations with our clients about environmental, social and governance issues in general, and this trend looks set to continue.

Many Canadians believe more industry regulation is needed

Over a third (35 per cent) of Canadian consumers believe technology companies are not regulated enough, which indexes higher than the global average of 29 per cent.

For businesses in the tech space, this points to an increasing need to ensure their public affairs and communications are in lockstep. Like the transparency between social and traditional media needed to emerge, PA and corporate/reputation communications teams are going to need to be more integrated than ever.

Technology companies must work to close the trust gap

Trailing only consumers in the U.K., 37 per cent of Canadians said they trust technology companies either “not very much” (32 per cent) or “not at all” (6 per cent).

This indicates a significant gap between what technology companies are doing and consumer trust.

So, where do we go from here?

The technology sector needs to set a higher standard overall, behaving responsibly toward all stakeholders. It is no longer just about keeping customers and investors happy, it's about keeping a closer eye on the broader industry and consumer base. Otherwise, the alternative could be more government regulation here in Canada and around the world.

It could also translate into reduced profits as consumers, especially younger ones, continue to show their disappointment with their voices and their wallets.

Looking for more information and advice on the road to recovery? Find the latest COVID-19 insights and resources here or contact our team to learn more about our Recovery & Resurgence support.

“Don’t wait for someone to tell you to do the right thing. You know what’s right.”

As a mother to young boys, I’ve had the chance to share the above wisdom more times than I’d care to admit. It would seem today’s consumers have the same advice for the technology sector.

According to our new global research report, Techlash 2020: Why the technology sector needs to lean in now on consumer expectations, consumers want the tech sector to take a long hard look at its policies and practices. They want these companies to do what’s right by them and a majority want governments to step in and help make sure it happens.

From a Canadian perspective, here are just a few of the takeaways I found most interesting:

Canadians believe that the technology sector isn't doing enough

61 per cent of Canadians agree that “technology companies need to take more action to address the consequences of their policies, practices and products in order to (re)build trust as good corporate citizens who do what’s right for consumers.”

Not surprisingly, we’ve seen an increase in conversations with our clients about environmental, social and governance issues in general, and this trend looks set to continue.

Many Canadians believe more industry regulation is needed

Over a third (35 per cent) of Canadian consumers believe technology companies are not regulated enough, which indexes higher than the global average of 29 per cent.

For businesses in the tech space, this points to an increasing need to ensure their public affairs and communications are in lockstep. Like the transparency between social and traditional media needed to emerge, PA and corporate/reputation communications teams are going to need to be more integrated than ever.

Technology companies must work to close the trust gap

Trailing only consumers in the U.K., 37 per cent of Canadians said they trust technology companies either “not very much” (32 per cent) or “not at all” (6 per cent).

This indicates a significant gap between what technology companies are doing and consumer trust.

So, where do we go from here?

The technology sector needs to set a higher standard overall, behaving responsibly toward all stakeholders. It is no longer just about keeping customers and investors happy, it's about keeping a closer eye on the broader industry and consumer base. Otherwise, the alternative could be more government regulation here in Canada and around the world.

It could also translate into reduced profits as consumers, especially younger ones, continue to show their disappointment with their voices and their wallets.

Looking for more information and advice on the road to recovery? Find the latest COVID-19 insights and resources here or contact our team to learn more about our Recovery & Resurgence support.

Natalie Sauvé
Senior Vice President
Natalie heads FHR’s Media Relations practice, as well as our Technology team. Natalie’s focus on strong relationships and storytelling helps guide our media resources across the company, as she provides senior guidance to clients looking to make an impact on business goals through earned media relations.